Tips for getting in to veterinary school

Applying to veterinary school is a very exciting time in every aspiring DVMs life! It’s a great milestone, you’ve either finished a degree, prereqs or gotten experience hours finished up. Or maybe you’re on your way there and need some tips for getting in!

There are many, many things that each veterinary school considers during the selection process so this list is by no means exhaustive; there are things we don’t even know!

  1. Achieve a good GPA. While you can get into veterinary school with a less than perfect GPA a good one will help you tremendously and so GPA is #1 on this list!
  2. Be involved in shadowing, volunteering with veterinarians and any other hands on experience involving animals you can get! You should keep an accurate record of your hours, what you did and what type of animals you saw. This will make your application so much easier to fill out! Also, keep good record of contact information for anywhere you volunteered or worked.
  3. Get involved in the community! Having a diverse background is really helpful and will make you a more well-rounded candidate. The selections committee will want to see that you have pursuits outside of vet med, this includes school clubs. Bonus: When you’re a vet these outside pursuits will probably help you stay sane!
  4. Apply to more than one school, if possible. One tip for getting in is casting as wide of a net as you can. Research schools and find out what they are looking for in a candidate, this will help you select which schools to apply for. Check out their websites, most of them have a page dedicated to what they look for. I’ve used several methods over my 4 applications and this year I went with schools that took a more holistic approach, and now I’m starting vet school! (If you want help/advice please message/comment!)
  5. This goes along with #4, make sure you have the right pre-requisite classes for each school. If you are missing a pre-req but took a similar course E-MAIL THE SCHOOL. Don’t be afraid to contact a school you are interested in, they have teams dedicated to answering these questions. ASK!
  6. Write an awesome personal statement, and have as many people read it as possible. This is important, don’t just have vet affiliated people read it, everyone who reads it should come away thinking you absolutely NEED to be a vet!
  7. Have good recommendations. Don’t just ask anyone to write you a letter, make sure the people who are writing your recommendations know you well enough to talk about your talents and skills. I recommend at least one vet, a college professor/advisor (or both!) and an employer if you’ve had a job through school.
  8. Make sure all transcripts make it to VMCAS or TMDSAS early, when I applied this year the first thing I did was request transcripts. On my third application one school threw out my app because I requested transcripts about two weeks before the deadline and my school didn’t get it sent on time! Same goes for GRE scores, send them as soon as you can.
  9. Submit your application as early as you can. I don’t think this gives you an advantage for many schools but some do start looking at applications as soon as they come in, and schools like Ross and St. George have rolling admission, so they start interviewing as soon as 2 weeks after you submit!
  10. If you get an interview, don’t wear heels! This won’t affect your admission (as far as I know) but most schools have a tour before or after interviews and you don’t want to miss something because your feet hurt!
  11. If you get an interview, be yourself! If you try to edit yourself you will probably seem uncomfortable or unconvincing; it’s always best just to be yourself! The school wants a good fit and you should too!
  12. If you get multiple interviews, go to as many as you can! You never know what school will be the one to accept you. I was accepted to CSU out-of-state and they are known to be “harsh” on out-of-state students sometimes because they take so few.
  13. MMI interviews: if you have MMI interviews I recommend googling some practice questions (even ones not vet related). You can’t guess the content of the questions you will see, but you can get comfortable with talking for 5-6 minutes.

14. The final tip: if Vet Med is really what you want to do in life, don’t give up if you are          not accepted on your first or even second try. It is extremely competitive to get into            a school, it says nothing about what kind of vet you will be if you have to keep                    trying.

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“The difference between success and failure is, most often, not quitting.” -Walt Disney